Here’s The Opening Ceremony Tribute To Terrorism Victims NBC Doesn’t Want You To See

PARDON THE INTERUPTION

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Jacques Rogue needs a reality check. And some vinegar champagne. Photo by Reuters, London, BBC.

TERRANCE GAVAN – EDITOR – JULY 28 – 2012

The following is a short piece about what is and what is not appropriate.

The IOC’s Jacques Rogue – presidential apologist for all things Olympic – says that a moment or two of silence to remember the victims of the Munich Olympics is inappropriate.

Rogue – and other political so and so’s – say that the opening ceremonies should not be a venue for politics.

We hope the irony of this prince of political meanders spouting effusively about “political correctness”  is not lost on the families of those that perished in the Munich terrorist attack. And the athletes who demanded Rogue reassess his options on this divisive decision.

We hope that Rogue chokes on his Beluga Caviar and that his champagne has gone past its due date.

Rogue remains the fountainhead of all that is wrong with the IOC and amateur sport in general.

 Timothy Burke – DEADSPIN.COM – JULY 28 – 2012

The major transitional element of today’s London Olympics opening ceremony was a downtempo performance of adoptive sporting anthem “Abide With Me” by Scottish singer Emeli Sandé. The song and accompanying dance were a tribute to the victims of the 7/7 terror attacks in London that claimed 52 victims days after the 2012 Summer Olympic hosts were named. (It’s also been suggested the performance was a memorial to the war dead.)

Regardless, it was a rather significant and emotional moment in the opening ceremony, coming just before the parade of nations—and it wasn’t aired in the United States. Instead, viewers were treated to a lengthy and meaningless Ryan Seacrest interview of Michael Phelps. NBC regularly excises small portions of the opening ceremony to make room for commercials, but we’ve never heard of them censoring out an entire performance—especially to air an inane interview. We’ve asked NBC why they didn’t air the tribute, and if they get back to us we’ll let you know what they say. In the meantime, enjoy the performance everyone else in the world saw. [/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”][BBC]

Update (12:25 a.m.): Some readers have commented the official media guide to the opening ceremony makes no reference to 7/7. The sheer number of news stories that cite the performance as a tribute to its victims (as well as the performance itself) gives us pretty good confidence that the memorial was its theme. Here’s the prepared BBC remarks as aired:

Ladies and gentlemen, please pause silent for our memorial wall for friends and family who can’t be here tonight. The excitement of that moment in Singapore seven years ago when England won the games was tempered the next day with sorrow from the events of July 7th that year. A wall of remembrance for those no longer here to share in this event.

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